CARBOHYDRATES -HEALTHY STEPS FOR DIABETIC MANAGEMENT

NUTRITION FACTS TABLE

When you need to go shopping it can be a very time-consuming and frustrating trip, especially if you are diabetic.  The manufacturers of food products tend to confuse us with their descriptions and label information.  Remember, the food manufacturers are not concerned about your health in general; the food manufacturers want to profit and continue to profit regardless of  your health situation.  I want to stress this fact because unfortunately it is true.  Food manufacturers concerns are about profit, money and increasing profit.  ‘Business is business’  in most companies viewpoints and ways of operating.  

There are several factors that you need to consider when you are reading the labels on food items.  Remember to shop the outside aisles of any food store.  I am finding as I continue to work to decrease my blood glucose levels, the above statement is true.  I was on a shopping trip the past day and the majority of our items were on the outside aisles.  The items we need were meat, milk, eggs, cheese, vegetables, rye or whole wheat bread, fruits, and deli products.  The items on the inner aisles were saran wrap, cat food, cat litter, canned vegetables, canned meats such as tuna and salmon.  As you can see the majority of items needed for healthy eating are on the outer aisles.  

The following steps in carbohydrate counting are very important and will help you in your daily maintenance with diabetes:

Taken from the Beyond the Basics resources 2005 111019 08-377 09/08 Q-2M For more information on labeling, carbohydrate counting and fibre,
please visit the Canadian Diabetes Association website, diabetes.ca.

Step 1 Make healthy food choices

  • Enjoy a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low-fat milk products, and meat and alternatives at your meals. A variety of foods will help to keep you healthy.
  • Use added fats in small amounts. This helps to control your weight and blood cholesterol.
  • Choose portion sizes to help you to reach or maintain a healthy weight.

Step 2 Focus on carbohydrate

  • Your body breaks down carbohydrate into glucose. This raises your blood glucose levels.
  • Carbohydrate is found in many foods including grains and starches, fruits, some vegetables, legumes, milk and milk alternatives, sugary foods and many prepared foods.
  • Meat and alternatives, most vegetables and fats contain little carbohydrate. Moderate servings will not have a big effect on blood glucose levels.

Step 3 Set carbohydrate goals

  • Your dietitian will help you set a goal for grams of carbohydrate at each meal and snack.
  • This may be the same from day-to-day or may be flexible, depending on your needs.
  • Aim to meet your target within 5 grams per meal or snack.

Step 4 Determine carbohydrate content

  • Enjoy a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low-fat milk products, and meat and alternatives at your meals. A variety of foods will help to keep you healthy.
  • Use added fats in small amounts. This helps to control your weight and blood cholesterol.
  • Choose portion sizes to help you to reach or maintain a healthy weight.
  • Work with your health care team to correct blood glucose levels that are too high or too low.
  • Write down what you eat and drink throughout the day.
  • Be sure to note the portion sizes. You may need to use measuring cups and food scales to be accurate.
  • Record the grams of carbohydrate in these foods and drinks.
  • For carbohydrate content of foods, check the Beyond the Basics resources, food packages, food composition books, restaurant fact sheets and websites

Step 5 Monitor effect on blood glucose level

  • Work with your health care team to correct blood glucose levels that are too high or too low.

All food products have a food label which describes and shows the amounts and values of vitamins, calories, fat, cholesterol, protein, fiber, carbohydrates, and sugars.  The amount shown is for the serving size listed so if you need to have two servings or three, you would double or triple the count.  

The total amount of carbohydrate in grams  are listed first and includes: starch, sugars and fibre. (Starch is not listed separately.)  Fibre does not raise blood glucose and should be subtracted from the total carbohydrate (ie. 36 g carbohydrate – 6 g fibre = 30 g
available carbohydrate).

The following diagram shows a typical label:

Print

The following chart indicates carbs and carb counting:

Grains 1 Serving = 15 g carbs
Bagel (white or whole wheat) 1/2 of a small
Bread (white or whole wheat) 1 slice (1 ounce)
Bun (white or whole wheat) 1/2 of a small
Crackers, round butter style 6
Dry cereal, unsweetened 3/4 cup
English muffin 1/2 of a small
Hot cereal (oatmeal, grits, etc.) 1/2 cup cooked
Macaroni, noodles, pasta or spaghetti 1/3 cup cooked
Pancakes and waffles 1 (4-inch diameter)
Pizza crust, thin 1/8 of a 12-inch pizza
Rice (white or brown) 1/3 cup cooked
Beans & Legumes 1 Serving = 15 g carbs
Baked beans 1/3 cup cooked
Beans (navy, black, pinto, red, etc.) 1/2 cup cooked
Lentils 1/2 cup cooked
Starchy Vegetables 1 Serving = 15 g carbs
Baked potato (regular or sweet) 1/2 medium (4 inches long)
Corn 1/2 cup cooked
French fries, regular cut 10-15 fries
Peas 1/2 cup cooked
Winter squash (acorn, butternut, etc.) 1 cup cooked
Vegetable soup 1 cup
Fruits 1 Serving = 15 g carbs
Apple 1 small
Banana 1/2 medium
Blackberries/Blueberries 3/4 cup
Canned fruit (in light syrup or juice) 1/2 cup
Cantaloupe 1 cup cubed
Cherries 12 to 15
Grapefruit 1/2 large
Grapes 17 small
Honeydew melon 1 cup
Orange 1 small
Peach 1 small
Pear 1 small
Raspberries 1 cup
Strawberries 1 1/2 cup whole
Watermelon 1 1/4 cup cubed
100% Fruit Juices 1 Serving = 15 g carbs
Apple juice 1/2 cup
Cranberry juice 1/3 cup
Grape juice 1/3 cup
Grapefruit juice 1/2 cup
Orange juice 1/2 cup
Pineapple juice 1/2 cup
Dairy Products 1 Serving = 15 g carbs
Milk (skim or 1% fat) 1 cup
Yogurt (plain, light or sugar-free) 1 cup
Sweets & Snacks 1 Serving = 15 g carbs
Cookies 2 small
Chips 0.75 oz
Frozen yogurt, regular 1/2 cup
Ice cream (light) 1/2 cup
Popcorn (plain or air-popped) 3 cups
Pretzels 0.75 oz
Pudding (sugar-free) 1/2 cup

For more specific information or help, talk to your health care provider. The American Diabetes Association’s National Call Center also offers live advice from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST, Monday through Friday at 1-800-DIABETES or 1-800-342-2383.

This article has been reviewed and approved by Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator.

For more information about eating with Type 2 diabetes, click here.

Article created on:  11/2/2009

Some good links for you to view that expand on carbs are listed below:

Some resources for health and nutritional aides:


Cheesy Bread Muffin Mix
Diabetic Kitchen Cheesy Bread Muffin Mix

 

 

 


Gourmet Banana Muffin Mix
Diabetic Kitchen Gourmet Banana Muffin Mix

 

 

 


Gourmet Chocolate Brownie Mix
Diabetic Kitchen Gourmet Chocolate Brownie Mix

 

 

 


Gourmet Drinking Chocolate


Diabetic Kitchen Gourmet Drinking Chocolate

 

 


Gourmet Chocolate Brownie Mix
Diabetic Kitchen Gourmet Chocolate Brownie Mix

 

 

 



Visit Netrition.com
for a wide selection of nutritional supplements, weight loss, bodybuilding and low carbohydrate items.